Open Collective
Open Collective
Back to conversations

Challenges and equity gaps are replicated at the organizational level

Dean

Posted on August 23, 2022

In conversations with more than forty labor leaders and organizers across the country, I found that the worker organizations that are disproportionately impacted by the digital divide are: 1) smaller organizations, 2) grassroots, community advocacy organizations such as worker centers, sometimes collectively referred to as alternative labor (alt-labor); 3) organizations led by people (especially women) of color; or 4) organizations that support marginalized, historically underserved or low wage workers.

Each of these types of organizations are typically under-resourced and under-funded, circumstances which make it difficult for them to grow or expand significantly in size and power. Even though some may engage in advocacy, lead policy campaigns, and form alliances at the national level, they are highly dependent on support from foundations or unions, and such sources of support can be inconsistent, limited, or perceived as more risky.

Dean

Posted on August 23, 2022

As with individual workers, those that would benefit most from having better access to technology have the greatest difficulty accessing it. This is especially unfortunate because these organizations are overlooked and under-utilized vehicles through which resources and tools can be directed to workers that could help close the digital divide. Many are community-based organizations, and thus have direct, culturally unique, trust-based access to workers, especially in historically underserved communities.

Conversation followers

Tags

digital divide
cloud computing
netooze